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joaopauloadias

Jo itibaren Siabu, Siabu, Siabu, Mandailing Natal, Sumatera Utara 22976, Endonezya itibaren Siabu, Siabu, Siabu, Mandailing Natal, Sumatera Utara 22976, Endonezya

Okuyucu Jo itibaren Siabu, Siabu, Siabu, Mandailing Natal, Sumatera Utara 22976, Endonezya

Jo itibaren Siabu, Siabu, Siabu, Mandailing Natal, Sumatera Utara 22976, Endonezya

joaopauloadias

I read this book for something fun. I'd been reading a lot of serious classic books and just needed a break so I figured, hey why not zombies? I was very right to pick this book. blind japanese gardener/zombie slayer...Nuff said.

joaopauloadias

So...I have difficulty reading books, even if well-written, with interesting, developed characters, that does not have a plot. There seemed to be nothing driving this...besides the inevitable doom of humanity punctuated by love (mother-child, husband-wife, lovers, composer-music, artist-art...) as witnessed by the various characters narrating different viewpoints of the human experience. The characters--many well-known historical people from the various political and cultural wellspring that the doom of WWI and WWII and the interwar years paradoxically cultivated (Kathe Kollwitz, to Shostakovich, to a Russian lady-poet, and others). I must be the biggest philistine ever--because I adore Kathe Kollwitz's art, I like Shostakovich's music, and I love teaching about the early 20th century, even though it tears at my heart and makes me cry. Perhaps this is a book I just don't need--in my hubris, I will claim I "get it" already. Yes, there is beauty in the way Vollman fleshes out these people and details their loves and passions and the interconnectedness of it all (I even like how he characterizes Hitler--the "sleepwalker") but I just couldn't get into it enough to keep reading (Sorry Bro!). However, I am going to download Shostakovich's Opus 40 and Opus 110. And look for Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra--although that one I don't think was mentioned in the novel (at least not in the first 150 pp.) Can't wait to hear the musical interpretation of Nietzsche!